Christ’s Death: A Solution to an Unexpected Problem?

 This will be a short post, but here’s a question for you:

Was Adam born to die?

Personally, I find it hard to believe that he wasn’t. If Jesus Christ’s earthly existence could be so determined, if we can say of Him that He was sent as a man, born to die, why is it any less insulting to think that Adam’s life could be described in this way?

Looking at Christ’s death as if it was a thought-up solution to the problem of Adam’s sin is like suggesting that a man who designs a battery-operated toy might have done so without understanding before the fact it’s need for a battery.

What do you think?

6 thoughts on “Christ’s Death: A Solution to an Unexpected Problem?”

  1. Your analogy implies that inherent in Adam’s design is not only his potential for moral fallibility but the presumption of his eventual fall. I’m not saying God cannot have foreseen Adam’s fall–indeed, His very omniscience begs the question of why God would create a world He knows will become corrupted. It presumes that inherent in sin is some intended, divinely-sanctioned purpose, even though sin is by definition willful disobedience of God’s will for us. It smacks of that pretty-darned-uncomfortable conversation between God and Satan in the first chapter of Job.

    God, being a rational being, has His reasons, and like His peace I have no doubt that they quite often pass human understanding, too. But here’s the thing: As I read your analogy, I see very clearly what’s in it for us as regards Christ’s life, death and resurrection. What I can’t grasp via your analogy is what’s in it for God.

  2. Your analogy implies that inherent in Adam’s design is not only his potential for moral fallibility but the presumption of his eventual fall. I’m not saying God cannot have foreseen Adam’s fall–indeed, His very omniscience begs the question of why God would create a world He knows will become corrupted. It presumes that inherent in sin is some intended, divinely-sanctioned purpose, even though sin is by definition willful disobedience of God’s will for us. It smacks of that pretty-darned-uncomfortable conversation between God and Satan in the first chapter of Job.

    God, being a rational being, has His reasons, and like His peace I have no doubt that they quite often pass human understanding, too. But here’s the thing: As I read your analogy, I see very clearly what’s in it for us as regards Christ’s life, death and resurrection. What I can’t grasp via your analogy is what’s in it for God.

  3. John,
    When I read Romans 9 I see God as saying that all these things were designed to show his love, his justice, his very nature if you will. The closest I can come to describe it is to compare it to writing. Even though an author knows and even chooses the eventual outcome of all the characters he creates, it still pleases him and glorifies him to do so. I think it is almost the very nature of omnipotence that when the Almighty “writes” his parchment is reality.

    That’s just what’s been playing through my mind of late. I think that when we are made into the glorified bride and we gaze upon the complete work of God, we will bow down forevermore and call our Beloved great. I think we will find that we can do nothing else.

    Thanks for the read and the comment. (if I misunderstood your question, please clarify)
    Charles

  4. John,
    When I read Romans 9 I see God as saying that all these things were designed to show his love, his justice, his very nature if you will. The closest I can come to describe it is to compare it to writing. Even though an author knows and even chooses the eventual outcome of all the characters he creates, it still pleases him and glorifies him to do so. I think it is almost the very nature of omnipotence that when the Almighty “writes” his parchment is reality.

    That’s just what’s been playing through my mind of late. I think that when we are made into the glorified bride and we gaze upon the complete work of God, we will bow down forevermore and call our Beloved great. I think we will find that we can do nothing else.

    Thanks for the read and the comment. (if I misunderstood your question, please clarify)
    Charles

  5. I am compelled to answer “no,” although I acknowledge God’s omniscience and therefore foreknowledge of Adam’s fall. A “yes” answer presupposes a God who is decided to send billions to hell for the fun of it. I cannot abide such an answer. I need, however, to flesh out my thoughts more.

    Cheers.

  6. I am compelled to answer “no,” although I acknowledge God’s omniscience and therefore foreknowledge of Adam’s fall. A “yes” answer presupposes a God who is decided to send billions to hell for the fun of it. I cannot abide such an answer. I need, however, to flesh out my thoughts more.

    Cheers.

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